Category Archives: Sleep Apnea

Travel CPAP

Not your father’s CPAP

We’ve come a long way with this life-saving device.

CPAP machines have been steadily improving since the first commercialized CPAP was introduced in the 1980s. The devices have become much smaller, quieter, much more comfortable, and more effective in treating sleep apnea. To see just how far CPAP technology has come, let’s peek back in time.

CPAP technology was first conceived by Dr. Collin Sullivan, an Australian physician. He was testing the idea of positive pressure to open the airway, but his research was initially only conducted on dogs. One day a patient came to his lab with signs of severe sleep apnea. This patient became the first human subject to be tested using continuous positive airway pressure.

The first machine was quite rudimentary. Dr. Sullivan fashioned the mask from plastic tubes and a silicone sealant. He fabricated the compressor in one afternoon and tested the device by increasing and decreasing the pressure to find the ideal level. After several hours of treatment, the patient reported restful sleep upon waking. Dr. Sullivan knew he was onto something with tremendous potential.

Dr. Michael Friedman, medical director at Chicago ENT was around for the advent of CPAP. He has treated more than 30,000 sleep apnea patients over his 30-year career.

“When I first started practice, there was no treatment for sleep apnea. There was no CPAP and there was no surgery. When CPAP came out, it was almost inconceivable to me that a patient would accept CPAP. And it was a rare patient that would even be willing to try it. When we would tell a patient that they were going to sleep with a mask on their face and there would be a machine pushing air, they thought we were out of our minds, and I often couldn’t believe that patients were willing to use it.

Feeling good is addicting.

“I had a good friend that had been working with sleep apnea patients, and I asked him, ‘How do you get patients to accept CPAP?’ And his answer was, ‘Feeling good is addicting, and once patients wake up and they feel 20 years younger, and they wake up not feeling like they need eight hours more sleep, they do not ever want to go back to that feeling.’ So, CPAP when it is used successfully, has amazing effects. It’s so common now that I almost never find a patient who doesn’t have a friend, a colleague, a family member, spouse – somebody who uses CPAP. Most patients are very willing to try CPAP.

“CPAP technology has really changed across time. There used to the notion of a big mask covering your face that looks like Darth Vader. That idea is gone. The new masks are soft, comfortable, often very low profile with a small amount of tubing that goes into the nose. Also, the size is much smaller. The size of a unit used to be as large as a suitcase and now they can be as small as a deck of cards.

“People also wonder about travelling with CPAP. My friend I mentioned earlier used to say, ‘If you can take your toothbrush, you can take your CPAP.’ CPAP is so common that a lot of the TSA lines instruct you to keep your CPAP separate for the x-ray machine. It’s also not counted as one of your carry-on bags. It’s a free bag.  

“One of the other improvements is how quiet they’ve become. There is a common misconception that CPAP machines are noisy and disruptive. But I have yet to meet a bed partner who does not prefer the CPAP over snoring. It’s generally a quiet and soothing sound and is usually not a problem.

“There are also ‘smart’ models that can sense whether the CPAP is being used or if it’s sitting in a closet. It can also tell if the mask is properly secured or if there is a leak. In addition, it will know if obstructive events are occurring, and will supply a report with a sleep score and a summary of how the patient performed during the night with their CPAP. These data are crucial to fine-tuning the pressure settings, the comfort, and the type of mask that a patient will use.”

What’s next for CPAP?

According to the National Sleep Foundation, rates of sleep apnea are rising in the US and many people go undiagnosed. The real number of people with the disorder may even be as high as 30 million. CPAP remains the gold standard in sleep apnea treatment, and manufacturers are continually making changes to the masks to make them more comfortable. One of the more recent design improvements include built-in humidifiers that keep air moist, and full-face masks for people with beards.

It’s important to know that there are many alternative therapies, from an oral appliance to Inspire, an implanted device that works with your natural breathing rhythm to deliver mild and painless stimulation to keep your airway open during sleep. Chicago ENT currently offers 21 distinct treatments to control sleep apnea. To see one of our sleep specialists, call 773-296-5500.

Dr. Friedman co-editor of new textbook

The second edition of the textbook, Sleep Apnea and Snoring: Surgical and Non-Surgical Therapy, edited by Chicago ENT medical director Dr. Michael Friedman and Dr. Ofer Jacobowitz is scheduled for release May 16, 2019.

Recent years have brought many significant changes to the field of sleep apnea and snoring, and this new edition is up to date with every effective intervention. a focused, multidisciplinary approach to all sleep apnea and snoring related illnesses, making it an outstanding reference for surgery in this key area within otolaryngology. New chapters, new video clips, new techniques and procedures, and new contributing authors.

To learn more about the book, click on this link.

Study Finds CPAP Can Increase Chance for a Longer Life in Obese Patients

Sleep apnea is more than just snoring and restless sleep. It has been tied to increased risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, weight gain, impotence, and more. Despite these health complications, many people are reluctant to take steps to treat it. First, denial that they have the disease interferes. And next, they are deterred by idea of CPAP therapy. However, a new study shows that CPAP therapy is linked to a longer life. 

Continue reading Study Finds CPAP Can Increase Chance for a Longer Life in Obese Patients

Sleep apnea treatment that doesn’t require CPAP

Frustrated with CPAP? Inspire can help. Inspire is a new sleep apnea treatment that does not require the tubes and breathing apparatus involved in using CPAP. Instead, during a small outpatient procedure, a small device is implanted that then works to open the airway whenever you sleep. You control the device using a remote, turning it on whenever you sleep and off when you wake up. During sleep, Inspire helps stimulate the natural breathing process. It syncs with your breathing pattern and helps your muscles to keep your airway open.  

Continue reading Sleep apnea treatment that doesn’t require CPAP

Trying CPAP for the First Time? Tips to Understanding Machine Use and Insurance

If you or someone you know suffers from sleep apnea, you are likely familiar with the CPAP machine, a medical device that helps patients breathe easy through the night. Dr. Friedman and his team of expert ENTs, allergists, head and neck surgeons, board-certified sleep specialists, as well as dental sleep specialists now treat snoring and sleep apnea with a number of non-invasive and minimally invasive treatment options. One of many treatment options is a CPAP machine.  Continue reading Trying CPAP for the First Time? Tips to Understanding Machine Use and Insurance

Who Snores? Not me! New Wearables Help Patients Become Aware of Potential Sleep Apnea

One of the biggest barriers in the treatment of sleep apnea is patients never taking the first step to be treated: acknowledging they might have a problem. “Sleep apnea is a disease complicated by denial,” says Michael Friedman, MD, Medical Director at Chicago ENT. “Since patients are asleep, they are often in denial about snoring or gasping. They are equally resistant to accept the fact that they are somnolent and fall asleep at inappropriate times and places.” Continue reading Who Snores? Not me! New Wearables Help Patients Become Aware of Potential Sleep Apnea